Kicking The Fancy Play Syndrome

Casino players have created their own lingo much to the dismay of ordinary Joes that walk the street. Casino lingo include terms that are unusually funny and some make no sense whatsoever. There is a term used gamblers called the Fancy Play Syndrome. The syndrome is actually a state of mind that players feel they are in. The syndrome can be characterized anxiety attacks, nervous fidgeting, sweaty palms and many more.

The syndrome can be cute to many players at first glance but can quickly become irritating and perhaps dangerous. Players with the syndrome feel that they are performing poorly and sometimes have to banter and talk aimlessly to anyone they see. It is a classic case of low self confidence. Players who have low self confidence seem to rely on other external factors to feel good about themselves. Some people may do anything just to get a smile or kind word from anybody they meet.

Paranoia is another effect of the syndrome. Players who have the slightest hint of paranoia continuously view their fellow players and even the dealers as public enemies that must be avoided at all costs. Paranoia seems to be the current trend of players in the modern age. Many believe that the casino is out to ‘get them’ or to ‘frame their lives in debt’ which makes them want to avoid the casino but cannot due to their gambling urges. These people are potential powder kegs waiting to go off at any moment. People who are paranoid have the signs of shifty eyes, continuous body fidgeting (as if they would run or keep looking behind their backs), and morose comments.

Players who have FPS should try to open up to other players and curb the feeling that they are out to ‘get you’. FPS creates a distorted view of how people are viewed and most of them end up hurting themselves emotionally and mentally.

Players seeking help should not only confide what they feel to their family but to seek help elsewhere. There are support groups that may not recognize FPS but can surely help with the symptoms one feels.

Other solutions to FPS can be to create a positive image of oneself outside the casino floor so that when a player enters a casino, they have something positive to fallback on.

FPS people should be more outgoing and participate in events that have or require a lot of social interaction. This type of social interaction is great for it is not the plastic type of interaction found in a singles bar or pick up joint. Relationships are formed faster with a more solid foundation.

Players with FPS should seek help if they feel they cannot control their emotions.

Edwin Lynch